A rope and a prayer book

6.16  ·  5,583 ratings  ·  590 reviews

A Rope and a Prayer by David Rohde and Kristen Mulvihill | Penguin Random House Canada

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Published 05.01.2019

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Book Review: ‘A Rope and a Prayer’ by David Rohde and Kristen Mulvihill

The compelling and insightful account of a New York Times reporter's abduction by the Taliban, and his wife's struggle to free him. In the process, Rohde became the first American to witness how Pakistan's powerful military turns a blind eye toward a Taliban ministate thriving inside its borders. In New York, David's wife Kristen Mulvihill, together with his family, kept the kidnapping secret for David's safety and struggled to navigate a labyrinth of conflicting agendas, misinformation, and lies. Part memoir, part work of journalism, A Rope and a Prayer is a story of duplicity, faith, resilience, and love. I gave this book a 5 star rating because it deserves it, but I stumbled over some of David's Rohde's description of his plight in captivity out of anxiety of my own, not anything to do with his

I gave this book a 5 star rating because it deserves it, but I stumbled over some of David's Rohde's description of his plight in captivity out of anxiety of my own, not anything to do with his For a harrowing seven months of captivity, Rohde, a Pulitzer Prize—winning New York Times foreign correspondent on assignment in war-torn Afghanistan, survived after being kidnapped, with two Afghan David Rohde , Kristen Mulvihill. The compelling and insightful account of a New York Times reporter's abduction by the Taliban, and his wife's struggle to free him. Invited to an interview by a Taliban commander, New York Times reporter David Rohde and two Afghan colleagues were kidnapped in November and spirited to the tribal areas of Pakistan. For the next seven months, they lived in an alternate reality, ruled by jihadists, in which paranoia, conspiracy theories, and shifting alliances abounded. Held in bustling towns, they found that Pakistan's powerful military turned a blind eye to a sprawling Taliban ministate that trained suicide bombers, plotted terrorist attacks, and helped shelter Osama bin Laden.

Yet even when we live it, it's difficult to learn from our own history. So often, we make the same mistakes in our lives again and again. But that does not stop us from trying to improve our lives. It is the hope that has launched a thousand thousand self-help books. These books often turn on a single thought; they force us to examine our personal histories from the perspective of the author's premise. In a sense, they personalize our personal histories. So how can the people of a country or a culture learn from history?

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Simon Winchester is one of those maddeningly gifted British writers who could probably write the history of mud and make it fascinating. In fact, he sort of did. Has he finally overreached himself? In places, perhaps. But what a rollicking ride he gives us anyway. On one hand this is a grab bag of sea yarns, as the subtitle suggests, and no one tells a better yarn than Winchester.

Instead, Abu Tayyeb took Rohde hostage, along with his Afghan translator and driver, and delivered them into the arms of the feared Haqqani network of fighters in the tribal badlands of Pakistan who are causing the U. Over the course of seven months in captivity in North and South Waziristan, Rohde got a rare but much-too-close look at the inner operations and the mind-set of the Haqqanis and their Taliban allies waging war against America from bases on both sides of the Afghan-Pakistan border. Rohde is a very good reporter, and he emerges from captivity not only having shown the courage to not crack and the wherewithal to finally escape but the recall to describe the details and dialogue of his experience. Escape-from-captivity books have a long tradition in , a British journalist named Winston Churchill scaled a wall in his own breakout from a Boer stockade and rode the subsequent newspaper series to fame. The narrative is divided between their experiences of the kidnapping, separated by thousands of miles, and an opaque lack of information. But over time, her side of the story becomes compelling and revealing.

After the attacks of Sept. Instead, he was thrilled to be dispatched by his editors at The New York Times to Afghanistan , to cover the fighting there. Two months earlier, he had married Mulvihill, a spirited painter and photo editor at Cosmopolitan magazine. Rohde sets out on Nov. Yet he feels some trepidation about the interview, arranged for him by an Afghan journalist named Tahir Luddin. He decides to go, but neglects to inform Mulvihill of his plans, fearing that she will ask him to cancel them and that he will have to accede to her wishes.

4 COMMENTS

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